NDC Oslo Coming Up!

Just a quick post today to tell you all how excited I am for the next event I’ll be at:

NDC, one of my absolute favorite conference series is going to be running their original NDC Oslo conference in the next couple weeks! As always, I’m so humbled to be among some of the most amazing people in the Software industry that I personally have learned so much from. I hope to be able to share my experiences and learnings with you all in return!

I’ll be speaking about two of my favorite programming languages, Kotlin and C#! If you’re a C# developer and are interested in learning more about Kotlin and what’s been going on with one of the hottest new languages, come check out my session where we will intro Kotlin, compare features of the language, and even talk about how they might play well together in the future! If you don’t come for the languages, come for the stickers! I’m coming in hot with some awesome Kotlin, Xamarin, and C# stickers.

If you aren’t coming to NDC Oslo, be sure to check out my Kotlin posts here as well as check out my course on Pluralsight – Building Andorid Apps with Kotlin: Getting Started to learn about how to apply Kotlin to building native Android apps with the latest and greatest tools!

You can also checkout an older version of my Kotlin for C# Developers talk from NDC London here. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pR8zPYlNU0k

Can’t wait! See you there!


If you like what you see, don’t forget to follow me on twitter @Suave_Pirate, check out my GitHub, and subscribe to my blog to learn more mobile developer tips and tricks!

Interested in sponsoring developer content? Message @Suave_Pirate on twitter for details.

Advertisements

Clean Up Your Client to Business Logic Relationship With a Result Pattern (C#)

If you’ve been developing well structured and scalable code bases, you probably focus a whole lot on your “Separation of Concerns”. Maybe you implement a design pattern or code architectures like SOLID, Clean, or Onion to enforce some stricter rules around those separations.

In the .NET world, we use a lot of Inversion of Control and Dependency Injection. Especially in ASP.NET Core. However, I find that a lot of implementations are still missing one big separation – error handling.

The most common case I see in a decently structured application is:

  • Controller injects a service
  • Service runs business logic
  • On error, service throws exception
  • Controller exposes that an error happened via catching exception

One problem I have with this is that the Controller is now handling some business logic by managing the error. So what is my proposal? Handle your business logic errors / validation and expose the result of that logic, whether successful or with errors, to the controller that then determines the proper HTTP Response Code and message to return based on the type of result.

This is often just called the Result Pattern but I think it goes beyond this concept when wrapping it up into something like CLEAN or Onion. So, I often refer to it as the Service Result Pattern. I typically employ this pattern in all of my applications – back end and front end alike.

Here is what it looks like in C#. We want to create a Result object that our business logic will return to our Controller, ViewModel, View, etc. Samples here will be referring to an ASP.NET Core 2.1 RESTful API implementation, but the pattern can be applied everywhere.

So we need:
– Result classes
– A controller that returns IActionResult
– A business logic class that returns a Result
– Validation and error handling logic

The Result Model

I’ve created a NuGet package for these Result models if you want to use those, but these are the essentials duplicated here if you want to do it yourself. The package can be found here:

NuGet: https://www.nuget.org/packages/ServiceResult/
GitHub: https://github.com/SuavePirate/ServiceResult

First we want an abstract Result class that contains the data, errors, and the type. Then we can create child types that can make the typing of our results stronger.

Result.cs

public abstract class Result<T>
{
    public abstract ResultType ResultType { get; }
    public abstract List<string> Errors { get; }
    public abstract T Data { get; }
}

ResultType.cs

public enum ResultType
{
    Ok,
    Invalid,
    Unauthorized,
    PartialOk,
    NotFound,
    PermissionDenied,
    Unexpected
}

The idea is that for each one of these result types, we should have a strongly typed implementation. Here are a few examples of the most commonly used ones.

InvalidResult.cs

public class InvalidResult<T> : Result<T>
{
    private string _error;
    public InvalidResult(string error)
    {
        _error = error;
    }
    public override ResultType ResultType => ResultType.Invalid;

    public override List<string> Errors => new List<string> { _error ?? "The input was invalid." };

    public override T Data => default(T);
}

UnexpectedResult.cs

public class UnexpectedResult<T> : Result<T>
{
    public override ResultType ResultType => ResultType.Unexpected;

    public override List<string> Errors => new List<string> { "There was an unexpected problem" };

    public override T Data => default(T);
}

SuccessResult.cs

public class SuccessResult<T> : Result<T>
{
    private readonly T _data;
    public SuccessResult(T data)
    {
        _data = data;
    }
    public override ResultType ResultType => ResultType.Ok;

    public override List<string> Errors => new List<string>();

    public override T Data => _data;
}

Notice how the only one that implements Data as anything other than default(T) is the SuccessResult. This guarantees us our data is consistent based on the result type and we can instead use different error types to map the proper error messages, ResultType, etc.

Using the Result in Business Logic

Let’s take a look at a sample of how we can use these models in our business logic to house all our success and error logic.

MyService

public class MyService : IMyService
{
    private readonly IMyRepository _repository;
    private readonly IPermissionService _permissions;

    public MyService (IMyRepository repository, IPermissionService permissions)
    {
        _repository = repository;
        _permissions = permissions;
    }

    public async Task<Result<MyDTO>> GetSomethingAsync(string id)
    {
        try
        {
            if(string.IsNullOrEmpty(id))
                return new InvalidResult<MyDTO>("Invalid ID");

            var hasPermission = await _permissions.HasPermissionsToDoSomethingAsync();
            if(!hasPermission)
                return new AccessDeniedResult<MyDTO>();

            var myData = await _repository.FindAsync(id);
            if(myData == null)
                return new NotFoundResult<MyDTO>();

            return new SuccessResult<MyDTO>(new MyDTO(myData));
        }
        catch(Exception ex)
        {
            Console.WriteLine(ex);
            return new UnexpectedResult<MyDTO>();
        }
    }
}

This shows how we can use our different Result classes to step through our business logic in a very flat easy to follow and read way while still managing errors consistently.

Build an IActionResult from a Result

Once we have a Result returned, we want to give our controller the ability to map the type and data to the proper HTTP response. Doing this ensures that our Controller is only responsible for HTTP related logic, and not for business logic.

I’ve done this in the past with either a BaseController or with an extension method. If you want a simple extension method, check out my other NuGet package for it:

NuGet: https://www.nuget.org/packages/ServiceResult.ApiExtensions/
GitHub: https://github.com/SuavePirate/ServiceResult

Here’s what that method would look like:

ControllerExtensions

public static ActionResult FromResult<T>(this ControllerBase controller, Result<T> result)
{
    switch (result.ResultType)
    {
        case ResultType.Ok:
            return controller.Ok(result.Data);
        case ResultType.NotFound:
            return controller.NotFound(result.Errors);
        case ResultType.Invalid:
            return controller.BadRequest(result.Errors);
        case ResultType.Unexpected:
            return controller.BadRequest(result.Errors);
        case ResultType.Unauthorized:
            return controller.Unauthorized();
        default:
            throw new Exception("An unhandled result has occurred as a result of a service call.");
    }
}

With this, our Controller methods can be made extremely clean. Here’s an example:

MyController.cs

public class MyController : Controller
{
    private readonly IMyService _service;
    public MyController(IMyService service)
    {
        _service = service;
    }

    [HttpGet]
    public async Task<IActionResult> GetSomethingAsync(string id)
    {
        var result = await _service.GetSomethingAsync(id);
        return this.FromResult(result);
    }
}

Assuming our _service.GetSomethingAsync() returns a Task we can keep all our endpoints clean and only responsible for being a gateway to our application logic! So clean 😀

Conclusion

All together, we are able to ensure our error logic lives within our application/business logic and that our Controllers are able to worry just about the HTTP side of things. We do a better job at separating our concerns, we keep our business logic flat and easy to follow, and we provide our consumers of our application easy to follow data and errors by ensuring we return the proper HTTP responses and structures.


If you like what you see, don’t forget to follow me on twitter @Suave_Pirate, check out my GitHub, and subscribe to my blog to learn more mobile developer tips and tricks!

Interested in sponsoring developer content? Message @Suave_Pirate on twitter for details.

Kotlin for C# Developers – Asynchronous Programming

Series Introduction

With my recent work in Kotlin in the last few years and my continuing work in C# throughout my entire professional career, I’m often asked to compare the two languages. This sparked the creation of my latest conference session – Kotlin for C# Developers.

The next time I’m giving this talk is at NDC London – https://ndc-london.com/talk/kotlin-for-c-developers/

But I figured some blog posts on the subject would be a great tool to sit alongside the talk. The goal of this comparison is to give C# developers some easy ways to get into Kotlin without having to dive in and build something real. Start with the building blocks you know and draw comparisons to one of the coolest languages on the market.

If you prefer to just jump right into a language / platform – I would happily suggest my Pluralsight course – Building Android Apps with Kotlin: Getting Started. Take a look here: https://app.pluralsight.com/library/courses/building-android-apps-kotlin-getting-started/

C# Async Await

C# has done arguably the best job at simplifying asynchronous programming for developers. We now hardly have to think about thread management, opening, closing, splitting, etc. We can just toss around some async, await, and Task and we’re basically good to go. As long as you’re using it properly all the way through your application, async asyncing all the way through, then you should easily be able to avoid lost threads, race conditions, etc.

If you’re new to async await in C#, here is a quick example of a process that sets a list of dogs entirely in the background (although done unsafely, it’s just a quick dummy sample).

public class DogAdoptionService
{
    List<AdoptableDog> dogs;

    public async Task<List<AdoptableDog>> GetAdoptableDogsAsync()
    {
        var dogJson = await new HttpClient().GetStringAsync("http://mydogservice.azurewebsites.net");
        return JsonConvert.DeserializeObject<List<AdoptableDog>>(dogJson);
    }
    public void BackgroundGet()
    {
        Task.Run(async () => dogs = await GetAdoptableDogsAsync());
    }
}

Kotlin Coroutines

Kotlin’s concept of asynchronous programming takes a different approach, but one that is just as easy to follow and use. They call it Coroutines. I know, I know, they missed an opportunity to call it Koroutines, but still…. they’re great!

class DogAdoptionService {
    var dogs: List<AdoptableDog>? = null
    fun getAdoptableDogs(): List<AdoptableDog> {
        var json = URL("http://mydogservice.azurewebsites.net").readText()
        val listType = object : TypeToken<List<AdoptableDog>>() { }.type
        return Gson().fromJson(json, listType)
    }

    fun getAdoptableDogsInBackground() {
        GlobalScope.launch {
            dogs = getAdoptableDogs()
        }
    }
}

Side note: this really isn’t the best way to make an HTTP GET request in Kotlin, but I wanted to make it as symmetrical as possible between my C# example.

In this example, we launch a new coroutine from the GlobalScope that executes the long running getAdoptableDogs() function. One thing coroutines does that is different from other simple async await style programming is making it easier to create and manage different scopes of your coroutines if you wish. Of course, you can still launch many different coroutines from GlobalScope as well as manage heavy concurrencies.

The docs on Kotlin Coroutines actually has some awesome and simplified examples so I definitely recommend checking that out.
https://kotlinlang.org/docs/reference/coroutines-overview.html

If you wanted to essentially await a coroutine from within another or from within the main thread, all you have to do is get a reference to the coroutine and call .join() on it.

Here’s how that would look in our previous example:

class DogAdoptionService {
    var dogs: List<AdoptableDog>? = null
    fun getAdoptableDogs(): List<AdoptableDog> {
        var json = URL("http://mydogservice.azurewebsites.net").readText()
        val listType = object : TypeToken<List<AdoptableDog>>() { }.type
        return Gson().fromJson(json, listType)
    }

    fun getAdoptableDogsInBackground() {
        val dogsJob = GlobalScope.launch {
            dogs = getAdoptableDogs()
        }

        dogsJob.join() // now we wait for the coroutine to finish before continuing
        system.out.println(dogs)
    }
}

I won’t bore you with tons and tons of samples of coroutines in different situations since the docs (linked above) already do an incredible job of painting different scenarios.

Conclusion

As we continue looking into Kotlin from the perspective of a C# developer, we see more parallels and similarities – especially in both of their ease of asynchronous programming! Whether it’s async await or coroutines, us as application developers can take our minds off of heavy duty thread management and more on our design patterns and implementations!

Let me know what you think in the comments or on twitter and be sure to check back for more developer updates and Kotlin and C# posts!


If you like what you see, don’t forget to follow me on twitter @Suave_Pirate, check out my GitHub, and subscribe to my blog to learn more mobile developer tips and tricks!

Interested in sponsoring developer content? Message @Suave_Pirate on twitter for details.

New Exam! AWS Certified Alexa Skill Builder – Specialty Exam

Earlier this summer, myself along with other Alexa Skill Subject Matter Experts (including Voicify CTO, Nick Laidlaw) joined Amazon to help create the new Certification Exam for Alexa Skill Builders.

We put in a lot of work over some intense workshops to develop and iterate on exam-worth questions and continue to work with the team at Amazon to determine the standard of grading the exam.

But the exam is now in a public beta! Take it now and let me know what you think.

AWS Certified Alexa Skill Builder – Specialty Beta Exam: https://aws.amazon.com/certification/beta-exam/

Taking the exam in beta form allows for strengthening the exam and the certification as well as future AWS specialty exams.

Other Exams from Alex

If you just LOVE exams and can’t get enough of the ones I help work on – be sure to take my Pluralsight Skill IQ Assessments. Read about them here: New Pluralsight Android Skill IQ Tests

Coming Soon to Blog Posts Near You

Side note for my more avid blog followers – apologies for the slow rollouts – I’ve been doing quite a bit of travelling and extra work the first quarter of 2019 but I have some great drafts in the works that will come around including work around:

  • ASP.NET Core
  • Xamarin
  • Kotlin
  • AWS Resources
  • Alexa
  • Google Assistant
  • Cortana
  • Bixby?
  • More 🙂

So stay tuned and thanks for your patience! I’m working on making more supportable and robust posts and OSS projects around them so there is a bit of upfront work as well but it will be worth it! 😀


If you like what you see, don’t forget to follow me on twitter @Suave_Pirate, check out my GitHub, and subscribe to my blog to learn more mobile developer tips and tricks!

Interested in sponsoring developer content? Message @Suave_Pirate on twitter for details.

Seed Your Entity Framework Core Data at Startup with ASP.NET Core 2

If you’re developing large scale database designs using Entity Framework, especially with Code First Migrations, you’ve likely wanted to seed some data. Perhaps it’s some constant lookup values or test data used in your local dev environments for on-boarding new team members. It’s also nice to run migrations on startup for when you are deploying to different environments!

This blog post is just a simple set of tools I commonly use to allow for automatically running migrations and seeding some data with some examples.

Basically we’ll:

  • Design a Code First Database with EF Core
  • Add a migration
  • Build two different Seeder classes
  • Build an extension method to run Migrations and the Seeders when the application starts

This doesn’t care about how you actually setup your DbContext within your app, what database provider you use, etc.

Database Design

Let’s go with a simple example of a Blog website database design. Let’s first add some POCOs for out entities then create our DbContext.

Post.cs

public class Post 
{
    public long Id { get; set; }
    public string Title { get; set;}
    public string Content { get; set; }
    public string PostTypeId { get; set; }
    public virtual PostType PostType { get; set; }
}

PostType.cs

public class PostType
{
    public long Id { get; set; }
    public string Name { get; set; }
    public virtual ICollection<Post> Posts { get; set; }
}

BlogContext.cs

public class BlogContext : DbContext 
{
    public DbSet<Post> Posts { get; set; }
    public DbSet<PostType> PostTypes { get; set; }
}

Add Migration

Now that we have a DbContext and our tables, let’s create our migration!

In the Visual Studio Package Manager Console:

add-migration InitialCreate

or in the CLI:

dotnet ef migrations add InitialCreate

Building Seeder Classes

Now we have a database designed and a migration, so let’s create a seeder for creating some PostTypes that should be the same for every environment and then another TestDataSeeder to seed some examples for developers to use when running the app for the first time.

PostTypesSeeder

public class PostTypesSeeder
{
    private readonly BlogContext _context;
    public PostTypesSeeder(BlogContext context)
    {
        _context = context;
    }

    public void SeedData()
    {
        AddNewType(new PostType { Id = 0, Name = "Standard" });
        AddNewType(new PostType { Id = 1, Name = "Aside" });
        AddNewType(new PostType { Id = 2, Name = "Snippet" });
        _context.SaveChanges();
    }

    // since we run this seeder when the app starts
    // we should avoid adding duplicates, so check first
    // then add
    private void AddNewType(PostType postType)
    {
        var existingType = _context.PostTypes.FirstOrDefault(p => p.Name == postType.Name);
        if(existingType == null)
        {
            _context.PostTypes.Add(postType);
        }
    }
}

This seeder let’s us add 3 different PostTypes if they don’t already exist.

TestDataSeeder.cs

public class TestDataSeeder
{
    private readonly BlogContext _context;
    public TestDataSeeder(BlogContext context)
    {
        _context = context;
    }

    public void SeedData()
    {
        _context.Posts.Add(new Post
        {
            Name = "Test Post 1",
            Content = "This is my standard post for testing",
            PostTypeId = 0
        };
        _context.Posts.Add(new Post
        {
            Name = "Test Post 2",
            Content = "This is my aside post for testing",
            PostTypeId = 2
        };

        _context.SaveChanges();
    }
}

Building the WebHost Extension

Now that we have our seeders. Let’s build that extension method for running the migration and running this seeders.

WebHostExtensions.cs

public static class WebHostExtensions
{
    public static IWebHost SeedData(this IWebHost host)
    {
        using (var scope = host.Services.CreateScope())
        {
            var services = scope.ServiceProvider;
            var context = services.GetService<BlogContext>();

            // now we have the DbContext. Run migrations
            context.Database.Migrate();

            // now that the database is up to date. Let's seed
            new PostTypesSeeder(context).SeedData();

#if DEBUG
            // if we are debugging, then let's run the test data seeder
            // alternatively, check against the environment to run this seeder
            new TestDataSeeder(context).SeedData();
#endif
        }
    }
}

Implementing the Extension

Now that we have our database and entities, seeders, and an extension method – let’s just drop it in our Program class to run when we are creating the WebHost!

Program.cs

public class Program
{
    public static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        CreateWebHostBuilder(args).Build().SeedData().Run();
    }

    public static IWebHostBuilder CreateWebHostBuilder(string[] args) =>
        WebHost.CreateDefaultBuilder(args)
            .UseStartup<Startup>();

}

Note: although this Program is in the ASP.NET Core 2.1 style, the same code works in the original 2.0 style. Just stick it after the Build() call wherever you run that.

And that’s it! Now we have always-up-to-date data whenever we run our ASP.NET Core app! 😀


If you like what you see, don’t forget to follow me on twitter @Suave_Pirate, check out my GitHub, and subscribe to my blog to learn more mobile developer tips and tricks!

Interested in sponsoring developer content? Message @Suave_Pirate on twitter for details.

New Pluralsight Android Skill IQ Tests

I recently worked with Pluralsight (pluralsight.com) to help produce 2 brand spankin’ new Skill IQ Tests! Test your skills and knowledge of Android development, Android Studio, Kotlin and more!

Android Tooling Skill Assessment

The first is Android Tooling! You can test your knowledge of:

  • Android Studio – Analyze
  • Android Studio – Basics
  • Android Studio – Build
  • Android Studio – Code Manipulation
  • Android Studio – File Structure
  • Android Studio – Run
  • Android Studio – Settings
  • Android Studio – Tools
  • Android Studio – Version Control
  • Gradle

Although this exam is still in Beta (as of writing this post), you can still take the exam and I encourage you to as well! Pluralsight does some really cool work to calibrate the curve of the skill assessment so give it a go and let me know how you do 🙂

Take it here: https://app.pluralsight.com/score/skill-assessment/android-tooling/intro#/v2/landing 


Kotlin: Enhancing App Experience

The second skill assessment is for you Kotlin lovers like me and dives into some deeper knowledge of building better Android apps with Kotlin!

Kotlin is an open-source JVM language created by JetBrains. It is one of the most popular languages used in Android development.

The assessment may cover:

  • Activities
  • Enhanced System Integration
  • Threading and Background Work
  • User Interface and Experience

This assessment is also still in Beta, but be sure to try this one out and see if your Kotlin skills are up to snuff.

Check Out My Course!

Oh wow how topical and convenient! Be sure to check out my course on Building Android Apps with Kotlin: Getting Started to learn a lot about the fundamentals of both the Kotlin language and Android development as a whole! I assure it will help drive that Skill IQ Up for both of these assessments 🙂 

https://app.pluralsight.com/library/courses/building-android-apps-kotlin-getting-started 

If you like what you see, don’t forget to follow me on twitter @Suave_Pirate, check out my GitHub, and subscribe to my blog to learn more mobile developer tips and tricks!

Interested in sponsoring developer content? Message @Suave_Pirate on twitter for details.

Xamarin.Tip – Build Your Own In-App Developer Options

This post is a continuation of building gesture based “easter eggs” into your Xamarin apps (native or Forms).

In this post, we are going to continue from these posts:
Xamarin.Tip – Add Easter Eggs to UWP with Key Combos
Xamarin.Tip – Add Easter Eggs on Shake

to talk about how we can use these gestures in Debug mode to give ourselves some shortcuts for testing and moving through our application quicker.

To breakdown the process setup – we added shake handlers (and keyboard shortcuts for UWP) that can invoke any contextual code in our application. We talked about using this for funny easter eggs, but this functionality can be made into something super useful for us.

I call this “Contextual Developer Options”. The idea is take that easter egg handler and use it to display some contextual options that can be controlled page by page or view by view. This can be toggling some UI updates, auto-navigating through the app, testing different scenarios, etc.

In this example we’ll be using MVVM and Xamarin.Forms to demonstrate the possibilities, but the same idea can be applied to any other pattern or practice. Basically we need to:

  • Register dev options to whatever context we want
  • Determine what context we are in
  • Display the actionable dev options

Before starting, I suggest looking at something like Allan Ritchie’s incredibly useful UserDialogs package https://github.com/aritchie/userdialogs

We’ll use it in our examples.

Setting Up Developer Options

First things first, let’s define our developer options.

DevelopmentOption.cs

public class DevelopmentOption
{
    public string Title { get; set; }
    public Action Action { get; set; }
}

Now, like I said, our example will be doing this in MVVM and we can use the current page the user is on as the context we want to apply.

I’ll start by creating a BasePageViewModel that we can use to set up our developer options and execute the action

BasePageViewModel.cs

public abstract class BasePageViewModel : ViewModelBase
{
    protected List<DevelopmentOption> _developerOptions;
    private bool _isShowingDeveloperOptions = false;

    public BasePageViewModel()
    {
        _developerOptions = new List<DevelopmentOptions>();
    }

    /// <summary>
    /// Shows the developer options. This should be called after a native easter egg such as a shake.
    /// </summary>
    public virtual async Task ShowDeveloperOptionsAsync()
    {
        if (_developerOptions.Any() && !_isShowingDeveloperOptions)
        {
            var titles = _developerOptions.Select(d => d.Title);
            _isShowingDeveloperOptions = true;
            var actionResult = await UserDialogs.Instance.ActionSheetAsync("Developer Options", "Cancel", null, null, titles.ToArray());
            _isShowingDeveloperOptions = false;
            // see if an option was selected
            if (titles.Contains(actionResult))
            {
                // call it if we find it.
                var option = _developerOptions.FirstOrDefault(d => d.Title == actionResult);
                option?.Action();
            }
        }
    }

    /// <summary>
    /// Sets up the developer options.
    /// </summary>
    protected virtual void SetupDeveloperOptions()
    {
        _developerOptions.Add(new DevelopmentOption()
        {
            Title = "Go to debug page",
            Action = () => UserDialogs.Instance.Toast("Not implemented")
        });
    }

    /// <summary>
    /// Adds the developer option.
    /// </summary>
    /// <param name="title">Title.</param>
    /// <param name="action">Action to perform when selected.</param>
    protected void AddDeveloperOption(string title, Action action)
    {
        _developerOptions.Add(new DevelopmentOption()
        {
            Title = title,
            Action = action
        });
    }
}

Alright let’s breakdown what’s going on here.

Our BasePageViewModel has a List that represents our different options for the given page. Then we have some protected methods we can use in our extended PageViewModels to setup different options.

In our SetupDeveloperOptions method, we can setup any option we want for the page, and we put a universal “Go to debug page” example action that is there on every page.

So here’s an example of a useful ViewModel that sets up a login page developer option.

LoginPageViewModel.cs

public class LoginPageViewModel : BasePageViewModel
{
    public string Email { get; set; }
    public string Password { get; set; }
    protected override void SetupDeveloperOptions()
    {
        AddDeveloperOption("Use test user", () => 
        {
            Email = "mytestuser@mydomain.com";
            Password = "myP@ssw0rd";
        });
    }
}

So what we want on this login page is to be able to shake the device and see the Action Sheet that shows “Use test user” and when selected, it should fill out the fields on the page automatically.

Now that our setup is done, let’s wire up accessing these developer options.

Wiring It Up

We need to be able to access our Page’s ViewModel in order to execute the developer options when the shake happens. To do this, we can access the current page via the Xamarin.Forms.Application.Current static accessor. Then use the MainPage property to get around.

I like to add a simple helper property getter on my App class for this:

App.xaml.cs

public class App : Application
{
    // ...

    // assuming MainPage is a NavigationPage. You can do some extra logic if it isn't
    public ContentPage CurrentPage => (MainPage as NavigationPage)?.Navigation?.NavigationStack?.Last()
    // ...
}

Now in our native app logic, where we were executing the easter egg we can call:

// we don't want developer options in production 🙂
#if DEBUG
await ((App.Current as App)?.CurrentPage?.BindingContext as BasePageViewModel)?.ShowDeveloperOptionsAsync();
#endif

So now if we are in our LoginPage and our BindingContext is set to our LoginPageViewModel, our shake should reveal the action sheet!

Conclusion

We can make our lives a whole lot easier when testing and running through our app by giving ourselves easier and contextual options throughout the entire application.

I’ve personally used this for some pretty awesome and intense stuff like:

  • Filling out forms with different values
  • Changing styles/themes of the app to easily compare 2 different UIs
  • Test different states of a page such as if a user is logged in or not
  • Test error scenarios
  • Build a page that shows logs of all interactions and background tasks in the app and use the developer options to navigate to that page whenever to see those custom logs live (even when not attached to the debugger)
  • Execute custom native code to make debugging easier
  • Navigate quickly to the page deep in the app I am currently working on

Remember to still write unit and UI tests for your app too! This is meant to be something to make real hands-on testing even easier too.

It has saved me hundreds of hours easily. Let me know if you end up implementing something like this too!

For now, I don’t have any complete open source project to demo this, but if enough of you want to see a full example and screenshots and different scenarios, I’ll consider putting a full project together. Let me know in the comments or on twitter!


If you like what you see, don’t forget to follow me on twitter @Suave_Pirate, check out my GitHub, and subscribe to my blog to learn more mobile developer tips and tricks!

Interested in sponsoring developer content? Message @Suave_Pirate on twitter for details.