Xamarin.Tip – Xamarin.Forms Long Press Effect

Here’s a quick and helpful tool to use in your Xamarin.Forms applications! How many times have you wanted to add a long press handler? Seems like something that should be a simple Gesture built into the platform, but we have to fend for ourselves. Luckily the solution is pretty simple using Xamarin.Forms Effects!

Let’s first create our shared Effect in our shared code:

LongPressedEffect.cs

    /// <summary>
    /// Long pressed effect. Used for invoking commands on long press detection cross platform
    /// </summary>
    public class LongPressedEffect : RoutingEffect
    {
        public LongPressedEffect() : base("MyApp.LongPressedEffect")
        {
        }

        public static readonly BindableProperty CommandProperty = BindableProperty.CreateAttached("Command", typeof(ICommand), typeof(LongPressedEffect), (object)null);
        public static ICommand GetCommand(BindableObject view)
        {
            return (ICommand)view.GetValue(CommandProperty);
        }

        public static void SetCommand(BindableObject view, ICommand value)
        {
            view.SetValue(CommandProperty, value);
        }


        public static readonly BindableProperty CommandParameterProperty = BindableProperty.CreateAttached("CommandParameter", typeof(object), typeof(LongPressedEffect), (object)null);
        public static object GetCommandParameter(BindableObject view)
        {
            return view.GetValue(CommandParameterProperty);
        }

        public static void SetCommandParameter(BindableObject view, object value)
        {
            view.SetValue(CommandParameterProperty, value);
        }
    }

Now we have 2 bindable properties – the Command that we want to bind when the long press is detected and the CommandParameter to pass into the Command.

We can use these in our native Effect implementations to invoke when the press is detected. Let’s create our Android implementation.

AndroidLongPressedEffect.cs

[assembly: ResolutionGroupName("MyApp")]
[assembly: ExportEffect(typeof(AndroidLongPressedEffect), "LongPressedEffect")]
namespace AndroidAppNamespace.Effects
{
    /// <summary>
    /// Android long pressed effect.
    /// </summary>
    public class AndroidLongPressedEffect : PlatformEffect
    {
        private bool _attached;

        /// <summary>
        /// Initializer to avoid linking out
        /// </summary>
        public static void Initialize() { }

        /// <summary>
        /// Initializes a new instance of the
        /// <see cref="T:Yukon.Application.AndroidComponents.Effects.AndroidLongPressedEffect"/> class.
        /// Empty constructor required for the odd Xamarin.Forms reflection constructor search
        /// </summary>
        public AndroidLongPressedEffect()
        {
        }

        /// <summary>
        /// Apply the handler
        /// </summary>
        protected override void OnAttached()
        {
            //because an effect can be detached immediately after attached (happens in listview), only attach the handler one time.
            if (!_attached)
            {
                if (Control != null)
                {
                    Control.LongClickable = true;
                    Control.LongClick += Control_LongClick;
                }
                else
                {
                    Container.LongClickable = true;
                    Container.LongClick += Control_LongClick;
                }
                _attached = true;
            }
        }

        /// <summary>
        /// Invoke the command if there is one
        /// </summary>
        /// <param name="sender">Sender.</param>
        /// <param name="e">E.</param>
        private void Control_LongClick(object sender, Android.Views.View.LongClickEventArgs e)
        {
            Console.WriteLine("Invoking long click command");
            var command = LongPressedEffect.GetCommand(Element);
            command?.Execute(LongPressedEffect.GetCommandParameter(Element));
        }

        /// <summary>
        /// Clean the event handler on detach
        /// </summary>
        protected override void OnDetached()
        {
            if (_attached)
            {
                if (Control != null)
                {
                    Control.LongClickable = true;
                    Control.LongClick -= Control_LongClick;
                }
                else
                {
                    Container.LongClickable = true;
                    Container.LongClick -= Control_LongClick;
                }
                _attached = false;
            }
        }
    }

And now for iOS:

iOSLongPressedEffect.cs

[assembly: ResolutionGroupName("MyApp")]
[assembly: ExportEffect(typeof(iOSLongPressedEffect), "LongPressedEffect")]
namespace iOSNamespace.Effects
{
    /// <summary>
    /// iOS long pressed effect
    /// </summary>
    public class iOSLongPressedEffect : PlatformEffect
    {
        private bool _attached;
        private readonly UILongPressGestureRecognizer _longPressRecognizer;
        /// <summary>
        /// Initializes a new instance of the
        /// <see cref="T:Yukon.Application.iOSComponents.Effects.iOSLongPressedEffect"/> class.
        /// </summary>
        public iOSLongPressedEffect()
        {
            _longPressRecognizer = new UILongPressGestureRecognizer(HandleLongClick);
        }

        /// <summary>
        /// Apply the handler
        /// </summary>
        protected override void OnAttached()
        {
            //because an effect can be detached immediately after attached (happens in listview), only attach the handler one time
            if (!_attached)
            {
                Container.AddGestureRecognizer(_longPressRecognizer);
                _attached = true;
            }
        }

        /// <summary>
        /// Invoke the command if there is one
        /// </summary>
        private void HandleLongClick()
        {
            var command = LongPressedEffect.GetCommand(Element);
            command?.Execute(LongPressedEffect.GetCommandParameter(Element));
        }

        /// <summary>
        /// Clean the event handler on detach
        /// </summary>
        protected override void OnDetached()
        {
            if (_attached)
            {
                Container.RemoveGestureRecognizer(_longPressRecognizer);
                _attached = false;
            }
        }

    }

Now that we have our 2 implementations, let’s use it in our XAML!

MyPage.xaml

<Label Text="Long Press Me!" effects:LongPressedEffect.Command="{Binding ShowAlertCommand}" effects:LongPressedEffect.CommandParameter="{Binding .}">
    <Label.Effects>
        <effects:LongPressedEffect />
    </Label.Effects>
</Label>

Now you can start handling long presses on any control! If you want to add it to a ListView just attach it to either the ViewCell or the internal View of the cell.

 

If you like what you see, don’t forget to follow me on twitter @Suave_Pirate, check out my GitHub, and subscribe to my blog to learn more mobile developer tips and tricks!

Interested in sponsoring developer content? Message @Suave_Pirate on twitter for details.

Advertisements

Xamarin.NuGet – Xamarin.Forms Dynamic Bindable StackLayout

I recently released a component I commonly use in my Xamarin.Forms applications for binding data to a wrapping layout here: Xamarin.NuGet – DynamicWrapLayout Announcement! In the spirit of this type of control, I’ve also released a new NuGet package for a bindable DynamicStackLayout. It’s a simple control that allows you to create a StackLayout and bind an ItemsSource collection and an ItemTemplate. This is useful for smaller, but dynamic collections with the use of the orientation changing of a StackLayout. This means you could have a horizontally scrolling list of cards, bind the orientation or change it to vertical, and play with positioning more easily than using a ListView. I would still highly suggest using a ListView over this control for a standard vertical stack of dynamic content since this control does NOT use any view recycling or virtualization which can cause performance issues with large collections or constantly changing collection.

Get it here

NuGet: https://www.nuget.org/packages/DynamicStackLayout

Github: https://github.com/SuavePirate/DynamicStackLayout

In the end, you get something like this!

Be sure to read the documentation below:

DynamicStackLayout

A Xamarin.Forms layout for creating dynamically wrapped views. Inspired by the WrapLayout example: https://developer.xamarin.com/samples/xamarin-forms/UserInterface/CustomLayout/WrapLayout/

Installation

It’s on NuGet! https://www.nuget.org/packages/DynamicStackLayout/

Install-Package DynamicStackLayout

Be sure to install in all projects that use it.

Usage

There are two key properties that make this control useful – the ItemsSource (like a ListView) and the ItemTemplate (although, you can also just add children to the view – it does both!)
Be sure to wrap it in a ScrollView though

XAML

Add the xmlns:

xmlns:suave=&quot;clr-namespace:SuaveControls.DynamicStackLayout;assembly=SuaveControls.DynamicStackLayout&quot;

Use it in your View:

&lt;ScrollView&gt;
    &lt;suave:DynamicStackLayout ItemsSource=&quot;{Binding Items}&quot; HorizontalOptions=&quot;Fill&quot;&gt;
        &lt;suave:DynamicStackLayout.ItemTemplate&gt;
            &lt;DataTemplate&gt;
                &lt;StackLayout BackgroundColor=&quot;Gray&quot; WidthRequest=&quot;120&quot; HeightRequest=&quot;180&quot;&gt;
                    &lt;Label Text=&quot;{Binding .}&quot; VerticalOptions=&quot;FillAndExpand&quot; HorizontalOptions=&quot;FillAndExpand&quot; VerticalTextAlignment=&quot;Center&quot; HorizontalTextAlignment=&quot;Center&quot; /&gt;
                &lt;/StackLayout&gt;
            &lt;/DataTemplate&gt;
        &lt;/suave:DynamicStackLayout.ItemTemplate&gt;
    &lt;/suave:DynamicStackLayout&gt;
&lt;/ScrollView&gt;

Don’t like data-binding and want to just use child views? You can do that too!

&lt;ScrollView&gt;
    &lt;suave:DynamicStackLayout HorizontalOptions=&quot;Fill&quot;&gt;
      &lt;StackLayout BackgroundColor=&quot;Gray&quot; WidthRequest=&quot;120&quot; HeightRequest=&quot;180&quot;&gt;
          &lt;Label Text=&quot;0&quot; TextColor=&quot;White&quot; VerticalOptions=&quot;FillAndExpand&quot; HorizontalOptions=&quot;FillAndExpand&quot; VerticalTextAlignment=&quot;Center&quot; HorizontalTextAlignment=&quot;Center&quot; /&gt;
      &lt;/StackLayout&gt;
      &lt;StackLayout BackgroundColor=&quot;Gray&quot; WidthRequest=&quot;120&quot; HeightRequest=&quot;180&quot;&gt;
          &lt;Label Text=&quot;1&quot; TextColor=&quot;White&quot; VerticalOptions=&quot;FillAndExpand&quot; HorizontalOptions=&quot;FillAndExpand&quot; VerticalTextAlignment=&quot;Center&quot; HorizontalTextAlignment=&quot;Center&quot; /&gt;
      &lt;/StackLayout&gt;
      &lt;StackLayout BackgroundColor=&quot;Gray&quot; WidthRequest=&quot;120&quot; HeightRequest=&quot;180&quot;&gt;
          &lt;Label Text=&quot;2&quot; TextColor=&quot;White&quot; VerticalOptions=&quot;FillAndExpand&quot; HorizontalOptions=&quot;FillAndExpand&quot; VerticalTextAlignment=&quot;Center&quot; HorizontalTextAlignment=&quot;Center&quot; /&gt;
      &lt;/StackLayout&gt;
      &lt;StackLayout BackgroundColor=&quot;Gray&quot; WidthRequest=&quot;120&quot; HeightRequest=&quot;180&quot;&gt;
          &lt;Label Text=&quot;3&quot; TextColor=&quot;White&quot; VerticalOptions=&quot;FillAndExpand&quot; HorizontalOptions=&quot;FillAndExpand&quot; VerticalTextAlignment=&quot;Center&quot; HorizontalTextAlignment=&quot;Center&quot; /&gt;
      &lt;/StackLayout&gt;
      &lt;StackLayout BackgroundColor=&quot;Gray&quot; WidthRequest=&quot;120&quot; HeightRequest=&quot;180&quot;&gt;
          &lt;Label Text=&quot;4&quot; TextColor=&quot;White&quot; VerticalOptions=&quot;FillAndExpand&quot; HorizontalOptions=&quot;FillAndExpand&quot; VerticalTextAlignment=&quot;Center&quot; HorizontalTextAlignment=&quot;Center&quot; /&gt;
      &lt;/StackLayout&gt;
    &lt;/suave:DynamicStackLayout&gt;
&lt;/ScrollView&gt;

Features

  • Bindable child views
  • Bindable to collections
  • Handles layout changing well (try rotating the device)
  • Doesn’t require custom renderers (All Xamarin.Forms baby!)

Notes

This does not use any native view virtualization, which means performance does not scale well with extremely large data sets.

Coming soon

  • ItemSelected event and SelectedItem bindable property (for now, you can add custom gestures and commands to your DataTemplate and handle the events yourself)
  • Better Collection Updating

 

If you like what you see, don’t forget to follow me on twitter @Suave_Pirate, check out my GitHub, and subscribe to my blog to learn more mobile developer tips and tricks!

Interested in sponsoring developer content? Message @Suave_Pirate on twitter for details.

Xamarin.NuGet – DynamicWrapLayout Announcement!

It’s been a little while since I’ve posted about any new Xamarin Controls or updates, but here’s a great one!

I needed to create a layout that could bind to a collection of data in Xamarin.Forms that fit to a dynamic grid that also scaled to larger devices and orientation changes. I thought about creating a new custom renderer that uses the RecyclerView with a GridLayoutManager and a UICollectionView with a custom layout. However, I didn’t need to bind to tons of data, so I decided to create a new control that is entirely Xamarin.Forms – No custom renderers!

I’ve called it the DynamicWrapLayout since it was inspired by the WrapLayout from Charles Petzold and David Britch.

Get it on NuGet: https://www.nuget.org/packages/DynamicWrapLayout/
Get the source on GitHub: https://github.com/SuavePirate/DynamicWrapLayout

Because it is all Xamarin.Forms, it should work on all the platforms that Forms supports! So use it everywhere! I’ll create another post about how I built it if you want to work on your own implementation, but for now, you can read the documentation on the control below.

Documentation

DynamicWrapLayout

A Xamarin.Forms layout for creating dynamically wrapped views. Inspired by the WrapLayout example: https://developer.xamarin.com/samples/xamarin-forms/UserInterface/CustomLayout/WrapLayout/

Installation

It’s on NuGet! https://www.nuget.org/packages/DynamicWrapLayout/

Install-Package DynamicWrapLayout

Be sure to install in all projects that use it.

Usage

There are two key properties that make this control useful – the ItemsSource (like a ListView) and the DataTemplate (although, you can also just add children to the view – it does both!)
Be sure to wrap it in a ScrollView though

XAML

Add the xmlns:

xmlns:suave="clr-namespace:SuaveControls.DynamicWrapLayout;assembly=SuaveControls.DynamicWrapLayout"

Use it in your View:

<ScrollView>
    <suave:DynamicWrapLayout ItemsSource="{Binding Items}" HorizontalOptions="Fill">
        <suave:DynamicWrapLayout.ItemTemplate>
            <DataTemplate>
                <StackLayout BackgroundColor="Gray" WidthRequest="120" HeightRequest="180">
                    <Label Text="{Binding .}" TextColor="White" VerticalOptions="FillAndExpand" HorizontalOptions="FillAndExpand" VerticalTextAlignment="Center" HorizontalTextAlignment="Center" />
                </StackLayout>
            </DataTemplate>
        </suave:DynamicWrapLayout.ItemTemplate>
    </suave:DynamicWrapLayout>
</ScrollView>

Don’t like data-binding and want to just use child views? You can do that too!

<ScrollView>
    <suave:DynamicWrapLayout HorizontalOptions="Fill">
      <StackLayout BackgroundColor="Gray" WidthRequest="120" HeightRequest="180">
          <Label Text="0" TextColor="White" VerticalOptions="FillAndExpand" HorizontalOptions="FillAndExpand" VerticalTextAlignment="Center" HorizontalTextAlignment="Center" />
      </StackLayout>
      <StackLayout BackgroundColor="Gray" WidthRequest="120" HeightRequest="180">
          <Label Text="1" TextColor="White" VerticalOptions="FillAndExpand" HorizontalOptions="FillAndExpand" VerticalTextAlignment="Center" HorizontalTextAlignment="Center" />
      </StackLayout>
      <StackLayout BackgroundColor="Gray" WidthRequest="120" HeightRequest="180">
          <Label Text="2" TextColor="White" VerticalOptions="FillAndExpand" HorizontalOptions="FillAndExpand" VerticalTextAlignment="Center" HorizontalTextAlignment="Center" />
      </StackLayout>
      <StackLayout BackgroundColor="Gray" WidthRequest="120" HeightRequest="180">
          <Label Text="3" TextColor="White" VerticalOptions="FillAndExpand" HorizontalOptions="FillAndExpand" VerticalTextAlignment="Center" HorizontalTextAlignment="Center" />
      </StackLayout>
      <StackLayout BackgroundColor="Gray" WidthRequest="120" HeightRequest="180">
          <Label Text="4" TextColor="White" VerticalOptions="FillAndExpand" HorizontalOptions="FillAndExpand" VerticalTextAlignment="Center" HorizontalTextAlignment="Center" />
      </StackLayout>
    </suave:DynamicWrapLayout>
</ScrollView>

Features

  • Bindable child views
  • Bindable to collections
  • Handles layout changing well (try rotating the device)
  • Doesn’t require custom renderers (All Xamarin.Forms baby!)

What does this thing look like?

Android:


iOS:


Notes

This does not use any native view virtualization, which means performance does not scale well with extremely large data sets.

Coming soon

  • ItemSelected event and SelectedItem bindable property (for now, you can add custom gestures and commands to your DataTemplate and handle the events yourself)
     

If you like what you see, don’t forget to follow me on twitter @Suave_Pirate, check out my GitHub, and subscribe to my blog to learn more mobile developer tips and tricks!

Interested in sponsoring developer content? Message @Suave_Pirate on twitter for details.

Xamarin.Tip – Read All Contacts in Android

To follow the posts made for iOS, let’s talk about reading the device contacts in Xamarin.Android.

Since Xamarin hasn’t been working on the Xamarin.Mobile component for a while, and James Montemagno dropped support for his Contacts Plugin, if you want to access the contact APIs on each platform, you might just have to go at it yourself – or just copy this code!

Android

The first thing we need to do is create our shared model to represent a contact on the device. In this example, we’ll focus on just the name and phone number of a given contact:
PhoneContact.cs

public class PhoneContact
{
    public string FirstName { get; set; }
    public string LastName { get; set; }
    public string PhoneNumber { get; set; }
 
    public string Name { get => $"{FirstName} {LastName}"; }
 
}

Now we need to create our service to enable the reading of the contacts on the device. We’ll call it the ContactService.

    public class ContactService_Android
    {
        public IEnumerable<PhoneContact> GetAllContacts()
        {
            var phoneContacts = new List<PhoneContact>();

            using (var phones = Android.App.Application.Context.ContentResolver.Query(ContactsContract.CommonDataKinds.Phone.ContentUri, null, null, null, null))
            {
                if (phones != null)
                {
                    while (phones.MoveToNext())
                    {
                        try
                        {
                            string name = phones.GetString(phones.GetColumnIndex(ContactsContract.Contacts.InterfaceConsts.DisplayName));
                            string phoneNumber = phones.GetString(phones.GetColumnIndex(ContactsContract.CommonDataKinds.Phone.Number));

                            string[] words = name.Split(' ');
                            var contact = new PhoneContact();
                            contact.FirstName = words[0];
                            if (words.Length > 1)
                                contact.LastName = words[1];
                            else
                                contact.LastName = ""; //no last name
                            contact.PhoneNumber = phoneNumber;
                            phoneContacts.Add(contact);
                        }
                        catch (Exception ex)
                        {
                            //something wrong with one contact, may be display name is completely empty, decide what to do
                        }
                    }
                    phones.Close(); 
                }
                // if we get here, we can't access the contacts. Consider throwing an exception to display to the user
            }

            return phoneContacts;
        }
    }

 
In this method, we get access to the Context‘s ContentResolver and query for all contacts’ phone numbers.

We can then iterate over each phone number and read their name and number which is added to the master list of PhoneContacts. This list is what ends up being returned, and we close the query context we opened in the using statement.

There is one more step we need to do in order to access the contacts on the device. In the AndroidManifest.xml we need to add the permission for READ_CONTACTS. This can be added in the XML directly or done in the UI from Visual Studio:
Screen Shot 2017-09-07 at 5.30.01 PM
 
Now that we have access to all the contacts on the device, we can render those in a list through either an Android ListView, RecyclerView, or if in Xamarin.Forms – a Xamarin.Forms.ListView.

Screenshot_1504821136

 Try building some other fun features into your ContactsService or selector!
– Filter the list via search
– Build a more user friendly selector without duplicating contacts
– Gather additional properties for contacts

If you like what you see, don’t forget to follow me on twitter @Suave_Pirate, check out my GitHub, and subscribe to my blog to learn more mobile developer tips and tricks!

Interested in sponsoring developer content? Message @Suave_Pirate on twitter for details.

Xamarin.Meetup – “Fluxing” Up Your Apps With Alex Dunn

Join us at the Microsoft NERD Center in Cambridge for the September Boston Mobile C# User-group on September 20th!

I’ll personally be speaking about implementing the Flux design pattern in your Xamarin and other .NET applications.

https://www.meetup.com/bostonmobiledev/events/242742363/

Meeting Details

Flux is the design pattern created by Facebook in your .NET apps to build robust and manageable data-driven interfaces. Learn what Flux is, how it differs from other patterns such as MVVM and MVC, and follow along and build your first app with Flux.

About the Presenter

Alex Dunn is a software consultant and architect with a passion for mobile application development and edge technology such as machine learning, AI, IoT, and modern web. He’s a Xamarin MVP and a Microsoft MVP for .NET, and can be found giving Guest Lectures at Xamarin University or organizing Boston’s Mobile C# User-group. Follow Alex and learn how to build beautiful and robust applications.

Twitter: @Suave_Pirate
GitHub: @SuavePirate
Blog: https://alexdunn.org
Flux Resources:

Source code for demo: https://github.com/suavepirate/xamarin.flux
Xamarin University Lecture:
https://university.xamarin.com/guestlectures/architecting-your-app-with-xamarin-facebook-flux
Gone Mobile Podcast:
http://gonemobile.io/blog/e0044.fluxing.up.your.xamarin.apps.with.alex.dunn/

 

If you like what you see, don’t forget to follow me on twitter @Suave_Pirate, check out my GitHub, and subscribe to my blog to learn more mobile developer tips and tricks!

Interested in sponsoring developer content? Message @Suave_Pirate on twitter for details.

Xamarin.University – Guest Lecture Available for Free!

Xamarin University has now published my second guest lecture on WebRTC and building cross-platform voice/video conferencing apps for free! Check it out here:

 

 

And as always, find the source code on my GitHub here: https://github.com/SuavePirate/Xamarin.WebRTC

 
If you like what you see, don’t forget to follow me on twitter @Suave_Pirate, check out my GitHub, and subscribe to my blog to learn more mobile developer tips and tricks!

Interested in sponsoring developer content? Message @Suave_Pirate on twitter for details.

Xamarin.Tip – Playing Audio Through the Earpiece on Android

Xamarin provides plenty of documentation on how to play audio in Android:

However, this never touches on directing audio through the onboard earpiece for applications such as voicemail or other real-time uses. Here’s a quick and dirty service that can be used in Xamarin.Android to direct audio through either the speaker or the onboard earpiece:

AudioService.cs

    public class AudioService : IAudioService
    {
        public AudioService()
        {
        }

        public void PlaySoundThroughEarPiece()
        {
            var mediaPlayer = new MediaPlayer();

            mediaPlayer.Reset();

            var audioManager = (AudioManager)Android.App.Application.Context.GetSystemService(Context.AudioService);
            mediaPlayer.SetAudioStreamType(Stream.VoiceCall);
            audioManager.Mode = Mode.InCall;
            audioManager.SpeakerphoneOn = false;
            mediaPlayer.SetDataSource(Android.App.Application.Context, Android.Net.Uri.Parse("android.resource://com.suavepirate.audiotest/raw/sample_sound"));
            mediaPlayer.Prepare();
            mediaPlayer.Start();
        }

        public void PlaySoundThroughSpeaker()
        {
            var mediaPlayer = MediaPlayer.Create(Android.App.Application.Context, Resource.Raw.sample_sound);


            var audioManager = (AudioManager)Android.App.Application.Context.GetSystemService(Context.AudioService);
            mediaPlayer.SetAudioStreamType(Stream.Music);
            audioManager.Mode = Mode.Normal;
            audioManager.SpeakerphoneOn = true;

            mediaPlayer.Start();
        }
    }

There are 2 important pieces required to stream it through the earpiece. Certain devices and Android versions only require 1 of the 2, but using both seems to be the best bet.

The first is to use the AudioManager service from the current Context and set SpeakerphoneOn to false as well as set the Mode to Mode.InCall. The second is to take the MediaPlayer object created and set the AudioStreamType to Stream.VoiceCall.

To go back to playing through the full speaker, revert the audio manager Mode to Normal, and set SpeakerphoneOn back to true. Be sure to also set the MediaPlayer.SetAudioStreamType with Stream.Music.

Check out an example of this on my GitHub here in Xamarin.Forms: https://github.com/SuavePirate/XamarinEarpieceAudioTest

If you like what you see, don’t forget to follow me on twitter @Suave_Pirate, check out my GitHub, and subscribe to my blog to learn more mobile developer tips and tricks!

Interested in sponsoring developer content? Message @Suave_Pirate on twitter for details.