Xamarin.iOS RKNotificationHub NuGet Announcement!

More awesome iOS controls coming our way as Xamarin developers! I’ve gone ahead and added another UI control to NuGet which is an incredibly useful little notification manager to add badges to any control or any frame in our view.

Check out the NuGet and GitHub project:

NuGet: https://www.nuget.org/packages/RKNotificationHub/
GitHub: https://github.com/SuavePirate/Xamarin-RKNotificationHub

Documentation


Xamarin RKNotificationHub

A Xamarin.iOS library for adding badges to any UIView, UIBarButtonItem, or position on the screen. You can also animate your badges!

Installation

Use NuGet!
Install-Package RKNotificationHub
https://www.nuget.org/packages/RKNotificationHub/

Usage

Once installed, create an RKNotificationHub.

var hub = new RKNotificationHub.RKNotificationHub(myView);
// or...
var hub = new RKNotificationHub.RKNotificationHub(myUIBarButtonItem);
// or...
var hub = new RKNotificationHub.RKNotificationHub();

You can then set or change the view or position of the circle:

hub.SetView(myView);
hub.SetCircleAtFrame(myFrame);

You can also set the color:

hub.SetCircleColor(circleColor, labelColor);

Then you can change the value of the notifcation:

hub.Increment();
hub.IncrementBy(10);
hub.Decrement();
hub.DecrementBy(10);
hub.HideCount();
hub.ShowCount();

And of course you can play with styles and animations!

hub.Bump();
hub.Blink();
hub.Pop();
hub.MoveCircleByX(x,y);
hub.ScaleCircleSizeBy(3);

If you like what you see, don’t forget to follow me on twitter @Suave_Pirate, check out my GitHub, and subscribe to my blog to learn more mobile developer tips and tricks!

Interested in sponsoring developer content? Message @Suave_Pirate on twitter for details.

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Xamarin iOS Expanding Splash View NuGet Announcement!

Here’s another fun NuGet package I’ve put up for everyone: The ExpandingSplashView is a Xamarin.iOS Binding implementation of the CBZSplashView from CallumBoddy on GitHub: https://github.com/callumboddy/CBZSplashView

It allows you to create a quick expanding view and add it to any ViewController very easily. It also allows for you to create the expanding view from either a rasterized image such as a png icon, or from a vector icon using a UIBezierPath.

Here’s the NuGet Package: https://www.nuget.org/packages/ExpandingSplashView

And the GitHub project for the binding and NuGet: https://github.com/SuavePirate/ExpandingSplashView
twitter-gif
Be sure to read the documentation either below here or on the GitHub project!

Documentation


CBZSplashView

A Xamarin.iOS implementation of the popular iOS control CBZSplashView from @callumboddy

Credit where credit is due (I just spent a couple hours fighting with the binding libraries, but @callumboddy did the real work): https://github.com/callumboddy/CBZSplashView

Installation

You can either clone the repository and reference the CBZSplashView project, or you can now use NuGet!

Install-Package ExpandingSplashView

https://www.nuget.org/packages/ExpandingSplashView

Usage

This can be used on any view, but is best suited for covering an entire UIViewController. Simply create either a CBZSplashViewCBZRasterSplashView, or CBZVectorSplashView via their constructors or the static initializer within the CBZSplashView:

var splashView = new CBZRasterSplashView(someUIImage, someUIColor);

Then add the splashview to your View:

View.Add(splashView);

Then start your animation whenever you want:

splashView.StartAnimation();

Here’s an entire ViewController class example:

using System;

using UIKit;
using CBZSplashView;

namespace Example
{
    public partial class ViewController : UIViewController
    {
        private CBZSplashView.CBZSplashView _splashView;
        protected ViewController(IntPtr handle) : base(handle)
        {
        }

        public override void ViewDidLoad()
        {
            base.ViewDidLoad();

            var icon = UIImage.FromFile("snapchatIcon.png");

            _splashView = new CBZSplashView.CBZRasterSplashView(icon, UIColor.Yellow);

            View.Add(_splashView);

        }

        public override void ViewDidAppear(bool animated)
        {
            base.ViewDidAppear(animated);

            if (_splashView != null)
                _splashView.StartAnimation();
        }
    }
}

If you like what you see, don’t forget to follow me on twitter @Suave_Pirate, check out my GitHub, and subscribe to my blog to learn more mobile developer tips and tricks!

Interested in sponsoring developer content? Message @Suave_Pirate on twitter for details.

Xamarin.Forms Floating Action Button NuGet Announcement

As promised, here is another release of one of my GitHub libraries for Xamarin! This time we are talking about the FloatingActionButton or “FAB”!

Here are some important links:

GitHub project: https://github.com/SuavePirate/Xamarin.Forms.Controls.FloatingActionButton
NuGet package: https://www.nuget.org/packages/SuaveControls.FloatingActionButton

Don’t forget to read up on my original post on how to create your own FloatingActionButton and how to use it: Xamarin.Controls – Xamarin.Forms FloatingActionButton (including iOS!)

Documentation


Xamarin.Forms.Controls.FloatingActionButton

A custom view to create a FloatingActionButton for both Android and iOS as part of Material Design

That’s right, even on iOS!

How to use

Clone the repository and open include the src projects in your Xamarin.Forms and Platform projects.

Now Available on NuGet!

Install-Package SuaveControls.FloatingActionButton

Special note for iOS: Make sure to call FloatingActionButtonRenderer.InitRenderer(); in your AppDelegate.cs in order to avoid linking it out.

Then you can include it in your XAML or call it from C# (See the example projects for a demo):

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="utf-8" ?>
<ContentPage xmlns="http://xamarin.com/schemas/2014/forms"
             xmlns:x="http://schemas.microsoft.com/winfx/2009/xaml"
             xmlns:local="clr-namespace:SuaveControls.FabExample"
             xmlns:controls="clr-namespace:SuaveControls.Views;assembly=SuaveControls.FloatingActionButton"
             x:Class="SuaveControls.FabExample.MainPage">
    <StackLayout Margin="32">
        <Label Text="This is a Floating Action Button!" 
           VerticalOptions="Center" 
           HorizontalOptions="Center"/>

        <controls:FloatingActionButton x:Name="FAB" HorizontalOptions="CenterAndExpand" WidthRequest="50" HeightRequest="50"  VerticalOptions="CenterAndExpand" Image="ic_add_white.png" ButtonColor="#03A9F4" Clicked="Button_Clicked"/>
    </StackLayout>
</ContentPage>

Android Example

Android Floating Action Button

iOS Example

iOS Floating Action Button

TODO:

  • Make it more flexible. Add Different color states, add sizing adjustments, etc.
  • Create UWP implementation
  • Create Xamarin Component

Come support the project and join the contributors list! We would love to see this TODO list dropped to nothing!

 

If you like what you see, don’t forget to follow me on twitter @Suave_Pirate, check out my GitHub, and subscribe to my blog to learn more mobile developer tips and tricks!

Interested in sponsoring developer content? Message @Suave_Pirate on twitter for details.

Xamarin.Forms BadgeView NuGet Announcement!

As promised, here is another release of one of my GitHub libraries for Xamarin! This time we are talking about the BadgeView​!

Here are some important links:

GitHub project: https://github.com/SuavePirate/BadgeView
NuGet package: https://www.nuget.org/packages/BadgeView

Don’t forget to read up on my original post on how to create your own BadgeView and how to use it: Xamarin.Controls – BadgeView

Documentation

 


BadgeView

A simple Xamarin.Forms control to display a round badge

Now available on nuget! https://www.nuget.org/packages/BadgeView

Installation

Install-Package BadgeView

Usage

<ContentPage xmlns="http://xamarin.com/schemas/2014/forms" xmlns:badge="clr-namespace:BadgeView.Shared;assembly=BadgeView.Shared" xmlns:x="http://schemas.microsoft.com/winfx/2009/xaml" x:Class="BadgeViewExample.BadgePage">
    <ContentPage.Content>
        <StackLayout Orientation="Horizontal" HorizontalOptions="CenterAndExpand" VerticalOptions="Center">
            <Label HorizontalTextAlignment="Center" Text="Look at me!" />
            <badge:BadgeView Text="3" BadgeColor="Green" VerticalOptions="Center" HorizontalOptions="End" />
        </StackLayout>
    </ContentPage.Content>
</ContentPage>

With Bindings

<badge:BadgeView Text="{Binding BadgeNumber}" BadgeColor="{Binding BadgeColor}" VerticalOptions="Center" HorizontalOptions="End" />

Without XAML

var badge = new BadgeView()
{
    Text = "4",
    BadgeColor = Color.Red
};

Additional Resources

Check out my blog post on how to build your own if you want!
https://alexdunn.org/2017/03/15/xamarin-controls-badgeview/

 

// TODO:

I’m still working on adding UWP support, but if you want to help contribute to the repository, please do!

If you like what you see, don’t forget to follow me on twitter @Suave_Pirate, check out my GitHub, and subscribe to my blog to learn more mobile developer tips and tricks!

Interested in sponsoring developer content? Message @Suave_Pirate on twitter for details.

Xamarin.Nuget – Coming to a Nuget Package Near You

Your voices have been heard – I’m bringing all my helpful controls and libraries to nuget!

Over the next two weeks, I will be going through each one of my projects and getting them nuget-ready. I’ll then be putting them up on nuget and announcing their individual releases here on my blog.

Here’s what you can expect to see on nuget:

So stay tuned, and if you want to contribute to any of these tools, please fork those repositories!

If you like what you see, don’t forget to follow me on twitter @Suave_Pirate, check out my GitHub, and subscribe to my blog to learn more mobile developer tips and tricks!

Interested in sponsoring developer content? Message @Suave_Pirate on twitter for details.

Xamarin.Tip – Borderless Editor

I previously put out a post on removing the border of a Xamarin.Forms Entry which was then used to create a custom PinView as well as a MaterialEntry that follows the material design standards for text fields. Check those out here:

In this post, we’ll apply some of the same principles to create a BorderlessEditor. It’s going to use a simple custom renderer, although this could and should be done using an Effect if being used on its own. However, this BorderlessEditor will be the foundation for future controls.

You can find this code as part of my library in progress to create Material Design Form controls for Xamarin.Forms – https://github.com/SuavePirate/SuaveControls.MaterialFormControls.

Let’s get started with our custom control by first creating a custom subclass of Xamarin.Forms.Editor followed by a custom renderer class for iOS, Android, and UWP that kills the border.

BorderlessEditor.cs

namespace SuaveControls.MaterialForms
{
    public class BorderlessEditor : Editor
    {
    }
}

Nothing special here since we are using the default behavior of the Editor.

Android

Now let’s create an Android custom renderer.

BorderlessEditorRenderer.cs – Android

[assembly: ExportRenderer(typeof(BorderlessEditor), typeof(BorderlessEditorRenderer))]
namespace SuaveControls.MaterialForms.Android.Renderers
{
    public class BorderlessEditorRenderer : EditorRenderer
    {
        public static void Init() { }
        protected override void OnElementChanged(ElementChangedEventArgs<Editor> e)
        {
            base.OnElementChanged(e);
            if (e.OldElement == null)
            {
                Control.Background = null;

                var layoutParams = new MarginLayoutParams(Control.LayoutParameters);
                layoutParams.SetMargins(0, 0, 0, 0);
                LayoutParameters = layoutParams;
                Control.LayoutParameters = layoutParams;
                Control.SetPadding(0, 0, 0, 0);
                SetPadding(0, 0, 0, 0);
            }
        }
    }
}

We simple kill the default padding and margins while setting the Background property to null. This Background is what creates the drawable underline for the AppCompat Editor.

iOS

Follow with an iOS renderer.

BorderlessEditorRenderer.cs – iOS

[assembly: ExportRenderer(typeof(BorderlessEditor), typeof(BorderlessEditorRenderer))]
namespace SuaveControls.MaterialForms.iOS.Renderers
{
    public class BorderlessEditorRenderer : EditorRenderer
    {
        public static void Init() { }
        protected override void OnElementPropertyChanged(object sender, PropertyChangedEventArgs e)
        {
            base.OnElementPropertyChanged(sender, e);

            Control.Layer.BorderWidth = 0;
        }
    }
}

All we do here is set the BorderWidth to 0.

UWP

Lastly a renderer for UWP

BorderlessEditorRenderer.cs – UWP


[assembly: ExportRenderer(typeof(BorderlessEditor), typeof(BorderlessEditorRenderer))]

namespace SuaveControls.MaterialForms.UWP.Renderers
{
    public class BorderlessEditorRenderer : EditorRenderer
    {
        public static void Init() { }
        protected override void OnElementChanged(ElementChangedEventArgs<Editor> e)
        {
            base.OnElementChanged(e);

            if (Control != null)
            {
                Control.BorderThickness = new Windows.UI.Xaml.Thickness(0);
                Control.Margin = new Windows.UI.Xaml.Thickness(0);
                Control.Padding = new Windows.UI.Xaml.Thickness(0);
            }
        }
    }
}

Similar to how we did it on Android, we set both the Margin and Padding to 0 and also set the BorderThickness to a 0’d Thickness.

Using the BorderlessEditor

Now you can use the BorderlessEditor in your XAML or C# code:

MainPage.xaml

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="utf-8" ?>
<ContentPage xmlns="http://xamarin.com/schemas/2014/forms"
             xmlns:x="http://schemas.microsoft.com/winfx/2009/xaml"
             xmlns:local="clr-namespace:ExampleMaterialApp"
             xmlns:suave="clr-namespace:SuaveControls.MaterialForms;assembly=SuaveControls.MaterialForms"
             x:Class="ExampleMaterialApp.MainPage">

    <ScrollView>
        <StackLayout Spacing="16" Margin="16" BackgroundColor="Blue">
            <Label Text="Borderless Editor!" Margin="32" HorizontalOptions="Center" HorizontalTextAlignment="Center"/>
            <suave:BorderlessEditor BackgroundColor="Black" TextColor="White" HeightRequest="300" Margin="32"/>

        </StackLayout>
    </ScrollView>

</ContentPage>

Check out those results on iOS:

If you like what you see, don’t forget to follow me on twitter @Suave_Pirate, check out my GitHub, and subscribe to my blog to learn more mobile developer tips and tricks!

Interested in sponsoring developer content? Message @Suave_Pirate on twitter for details.

Xamarin.Tip – Borderless TimePicker

I previously put out a post on removing the border of a Xamarin.Forms Entry which was then used to create a custom PinView as well as a MaterialEntry that follows the material design standards for text fields. I also added a post just like this one that talks about creating a BorderlessPicker. Check those out here:

In this post, we’ll do exactly what we did with the BorderlessPicker, but apply it to the Xamarin.Forms.TimePicker control to remove the border. This would ideally be done using an Effect, however we will be using this control in a later post to create a MaterialTimePicker to fit the Material Design standards for form inputs, so we will create custom renderers for Android, iOS, and UWP.

You can find this code as part of my library in progress to create Material Design Form controls for Xamarin.Forms – https://github.com/SuavePirate/SuaveControls.MaterialFormControls.

Let’s get started with our custom control by first creating a custom subclass of Xamarin.Forms.TimePicker followed by a custom renderer class for iOS, Android, and UWP that kills the border.

BorderlessTimePicker.cs

namespace SuaveControls.MaterialForms
{
    public class BorderlessTimePicker : TimePicker
    {
    }
}

Nothing special here since we are using the default behavior of the TimePicker.

Android

Now let’s create an Android custom renderer.

BorderlessTimePickerRenderer.cs – Android

[assembly: ExportRenderer(typeof(BorderlessTimePicker), typeof(BorderlessTimePickerRenderer))]
namespace SuaveControls.MaterialForms.Android.Renderers
{
    public class BorderlessTimePickerRenderer : TimePickerRenderer
    {
        public static void Init() { }
        protected override void OnElementChanged(ElementChangedEventArgs<TimePicker> e)
        {
            base.OnElementChanged(e);
            if (e.OldElement == null)
            {
                Control.Background = null;

                var layoutParams = new MarginLayoutParams(Control.LayoutParameters);
                layoutParams.SetMargins(0, 0, 0, 0);
                LayoutParameters = layoutParams;
                Control.LayoutParameters = layoutParams;
                Control.SetPadding(0, 0, 0, 0);
                SetPadding(0, 0, 0, 0);
            }
        }
    }
}

We simple kill the default padding and margins while setting the Background property to null. This Background is what creates the drawable underline for the AppCompat TimePicker.

iOS

Follow with an iOS renderer.

BorderlessTimePickerRenderer.cs – iOS

[assembly: ExportRenderer(typeof(BorderlessTimePicker), typeof(BorderlessTimePickerRenderer))]
namespace SuaveControls.MaterialForms.iOS.Renderers
{
    public class BorderlessTimePickerRenderer : TimePickerRenderer
    {
        public static void Init() { }
        protected override void OnElementPropertyChanged(object sender, PropertyChangedEventArgs e)
        {
            base.OnElementPropertyChanged(sender, e);

            Control.Layer.BorderWidth = 0;
            Control.BorderStyle = UITextBorderStyle.None;
        }
    }
}

All we do here is set the BorderWidth to 0 and the BorderStyle to UITextBorderStyle.None.

UWP

Lastly a renderer for UWP

BorderlessTimePickerRenderer.cs – UWP


[assembly: ExportRenderer(typeof(BorderlessTimePicker), typeof(BorderlessTimePickerRenderer))]

namespace SuaveControls.MaterialForms.UWP.Renderers
{
    public class BorderlessTimePickerRenderer : TimePickerRenderer
    {
        public static void Init() { }
        protected override void OnElementChanged(ElementChangedEventArgs<TimePicker> e)
        {
            base.OnElementChanged(e);

            if (Control != null)
            {
                Control.BorderThickness = new Windows.UI.Xaml.Thickness(0);
                Control.Margin = new Windows.UI.Xaml.Thickness(0);
                Control.Padding = new Windows.UI.Xaml.Thickness(0);
            }
        }
    }
}

Similar to how we did it on Android, we set both the Margin and Padding to 0 and also set the BorderThickness to a 0’d Thickness.

Using the BorderlessTimePicker

Now you can use the BorderlessTimePicker in your XAML or C# code:

MainPage.xaml

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="utf-8" ?>
<ContentPage xmlns="http://xamarin.com/schemas/2014/forms"
             xmlns:x="http://schemas.microsoft.com/winfx/2009/xaml"
             xmlns:local="clr-namespace:ExampleMaterialApp"
             xmlns:suave="clr-namespace:SuaveControls.MaterialForms;assembly=SuaveControls.MaterialForms"
             x:Class="ExampleMaterialApp.MainPage">

    <ScrollView>
        <StackLayout Spacing="16" Margin="16">
            <Label Text="Borderless TimePicker!" Margin="32" HorizontalOptions="Center" HorizontalTextAlignment="Center"/>
            <suave:BorderlessTimePicker/>

        </StackLayout>
    </ScrollView>

</ContentPage>

Check out those results on iOS:

If you like what you see, don’t forget to follow me on twitter @Suave_Pirate, check out my GitHub, and subscribe to my blog to learn more mobile developer tips and tricks!

Interested in sponsoring developer content? Message @Suave_Pirate on twitter for details.